October Tax Round-Up

As the spooky season approaches, we’ve conjured up our October Tax Round-up ready to support your business. We’ve heard hair-raising horror stories of companies grappling with their accounts in the dark, and we’re here to shed light on your financial journey, so always get in touch with our team if you have any questions.

WHEN ARE COMPANIES ASSOCIATED?

“Associated companies” for corporation tax purposes are those under common control. The most obvious situation is where one of the companies has control of the other, or both of the companies are under the control of the same person or persons. In determining control, the rights and powers of an individual’s associates, broadly close relatives, may be taken into consideration, but only where there is substantial commercial interdependence between the two companies.  This could be financial, economic, or organisational interdependence and will depend on the facts of each case. An example would be where a brother and sister each have their own limited companies and there is a large loan or significant trading between them, such that one is dependent upon the other.

This is not a straightforward matter and we can of course advise you on whether or not it impacts your company.

LARGER COMPANIES ARE REQUIRED TO PAY TAX QUARTERLY

Although not a new measure, where a company has profits in excess of £1,500,000 a year it is required to estimate and pay corporation tax quarterly during the year, rather than 9 months after the end of its accounting period. What has changed since 1 April 2023 is that the £1,500,000 threshold is divided by the number of “associated companies” in the accounting period, as defined above.  Thus, if a company has two associated companies, if any of them has profits in excess of £500,000, quarterly instalments of corporation tax will be required. If that company has a 31 March 2024 year end, it needs to pay its estimated corporation tax liability according to the following schedule:

  • 25% of its estimated liability by 14 October 2023
  • 50% of its estimated liability by 14 January 2024
  • 75% of its estimated liability by 14 April 2024
  • 100% of its corporation tax liability by 14 July 2024

As mentioned above, accurate profit forecasts are required in order to compute the quarterly payments.

Note that this is a significant acceleration of tax payments compared to the normal 9-month payment interval. Consequently, there is a one year “grace period” that applies for the first year the threshold is breached. You might also wish to consider minimizing the number of associated companies to avoid this cash flow disadvantage.

AUTUMN STATEMENT DATE SET FOR 22 NOVEMBER

The Treasury has announced that the Office of Budget Responsibility (OBR) will produce a report on the state of the UK Economy in time for the Chancellor Jeremy Hunt to present his Autumn Statement on Wednesday 22 November.

Last year the Chancellor announced a number of significant changes, reversing many of the proposals in the Kwarteng/Truss mini Budget the previous September. This time we are not expecting too many surprises. However, the leaks and rumours have already started with suggestions that there will be no significant tax cuts. There is also likely to be a General Election within the next 13 months so there may be a few tax sweeteners. The Prime Minister’s statement on 20 September on progress to Net Zero suggests that there may be a number of announcements concerning green energy measures affecting individuals and businesses. Another suggestion has been the possible abolition of inheritance tax which may encourage traditional Conservative Party voters to stay loyal (see below)

RUMOURS THAT INHERITANCE TAX MAY BE ABOLISHED

In the weeks before any Budget or Autumn Statement there are always leaks and rumours. Normally, in the run up to a General Election there are also tax give aways in an attempt to re-elect the incumbent political party. One rumour that has been circulating in the press concerns the possible abolition of inheritance tax (IHT). That would certainly be very popular amongst wavering Conservative voters as it would enable them to retain more wealth within the family.

This rumour may have the effect of causing families to delay estate planning pending an announcement. Tax planning can only be based on the tax rules that exist at the time, and should not be based on speculation over future law changes. A further uncertainty concerns tax changes resulting from a possible change in the political party in government. The Labour Party have history for increasing capital taxes and strengthening the rules concerning the use of trusts in tax planning.

The now disbanded Office of Tax Simplification produced 2 reports in recent years concerning the simplification of IHT and the complicated interactions with capital gains tax (CGT). The Chancellor may decide to take some of those suggestions on board or possibly abolish IHT and extend CGT to certain transfers on death.

As always please contact us to discuss your future plans concerning the transfer of your business and family assets. We will of course keep you informed of any changes in tax legislation that may affect those plans.